Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Music’

Allan Irvine: Guitarist, mentalist, madman. No, seriously. Who wears this outfit in Northern Ireland for fun?

Allan has been a good friend to me over the years, is another guitar.com find,  and was nice enough to include me on a project a year ago. Video after the interview. Ladies and gentlemen, Allan Irvine!


How did you first get into guitar? 

AI: I blame my Uncle. He was a total rocker/metal-head when I was still in primary school (7-8 years old) and I was the only kid in my class with a cut-off denim jacket that had a huge Led Zep painting on the back. It rocked! I sat every weekend listening to AC/DC, Saxon, Led Zep, KISS, WASP, Scorpions,Iron Maiden….. y’know…….late 70’s and early 80’s rock and metal. Getting into the guitar as an instrument and not just a bringer of wonderful noise was a logical conclusion almost. It was years after that when it happened though.

How old were you?

AI: I was 18. I’d just started college after getting 7 G.C.S.E’s at 16 and then a Higher National Diploma at 17. When I went on to A-level study at 18 I had my first proper job and the guitar was my first purchase with my 2nd wage packet. My girlfriend at the time wasn’t happy about it, but I didn’t give a shit. It was my ambition from school, my money, and my hard work that made that money. She soon became an ex, and my guitar was my mistress!

Was it your first instrument?

AI: No, I started off in primary school with a little recorder, then a Tenor Horn in secondary School. I hated them, I always wanted to play the guitar, and my music teacher wouldn’t let me near the Strat that the school music room had because he was a first class prick. I could have asked my folks, but I had too much pride and dignity and knew they couldn’t afford one. I had a great upbringing, but financially a tough one. My parents worked hard and what we had was minimal, but I seriously can’t fault it. I could never have asked them for anything as expensive as a guitar when I was a kid and I knew I’d buy my own some day. And I did…….now I have serious G.A.S!!! (editor’s note : Gear Acquisition Syndrome)

How did you first learn, who taught you?

AI: Guitar tablature was my teacher, addiction and entertainment for a few years when I first started out. I loved learning new songs and it never took much time to get to grips with them as I learn at an extraordinary rate. Within a year of first plugging in my very first guitar I was playing things like “Midnight” by the mighty Joe Satriani almost note perfect.

“I can be happy in knowing that I’m still enjoying the challenge.”


Kids now don’t realize how easy it is for them with the Internet and Youtube etc. I think some of these kids are amazing. But they have access to a world that we didn’t have when I was growing up. Jeez, even the tablature we got was awful sometimes, nowhere near the bloody song you were trying to learn! After a while though I was able to pick up most things by ear and transfer them to the neck as I learned and progressed. I can pick up styles and licks that others use and adapt them to my own way of playing. Anyone who says this is just copying is a dick. Sure, if I met a bunch of Beatles fans on Twitter and set up a cover band called “The Tweetles” or some equally as shitty pun, playing all their songs and dressing like them, then I’d agree! Fucking right I would. Those guys are assholes. But say if a classically trained pianist had studied some Chopin pieces then totally arranged, composed and played his OWN work including little Chopin-esque elements, does that make him any less of a musician? Does it fuck! In a world with 6 and a half billion people alive, and as many or more dead, it is hard not to be compared to anyone no matter what you do. It’s just how it works. And if you can learn from your heroes and infuse or include it it into your own style and playing then do it. Every guitar player you have ever heard has done it. I recently heard Guthrie Govan playing a piece made up in the style of his heroes, and he uses their sound and techniques but plays it the way Mr. Govan can play it, his own way. It was amazing. Not only is he better than nearly every one of the musicians he referenced, but you knew who they were instantly without seeing anything to tell you. Does this make Guthrie Govan a copycat/plagiarist? Seriously? Fuck no. If he is then Steve Vai was wrong in calling him “The best guitarist on the planet.” Personally, I happen to agree that he is too.

What was your first guitar?

AI: A cream Squire Strat. It was an average guitar, but it was MY average guitar and I worked damn hard to buy it. As I said, I wasn’t a spoiled little rich kid with too much gear and little or no talent. I had my crappy little Squire and a second hand Vox 15 watt amp and I played the shit out of them until I could move on to better things.

Tell me a little about your gear and your sound.

AI: At present I’ve got a Schecter Damien Elite 8-string tuned E,B,E,A,D,G,B,E I think!? I love that thing. You start off with a catchy little progression then “Berrrrrrrrrrr…….RAWK!!!” I totally skipped the whole 7-string phase and leapt from 6 to 8. It was a new challenge and I’m loving it so far. I also own an Ibanez JS, a few home-built Strats, an old Crafter Bass for recording (redundant now I have the Schecter, it has all the bass included!) and a battered old acoustic for practice. On the DAW front I have a Line 6 UX-1 running through Abelton. It will soon be replaced by a Line 6 HD500. I also run a Boss ME-25 now and again for different tones and effects. I don’t have a dedicated sound or tone and I change it constantly to fit whatever I have in my head when I’m recording. I’m still useless at Abelton though so although musically I can get by, as far as recording and production etc is concerned I suck. I’ll leave that to the pedantic knob twiddlers out there. Let’s face it, in the studio it’s just you and the instrument, the engineers do the magic on the other side so why get all arsey (anal) about it now? For now I’ll be happy with crappy quality recordings with some decent playing.

Listen to “**** You Rocksmith” http://www.icompositions.com/music/song.php?sid=184436

How do you approach song writing? What’s the process?

AI: I don’t write. Never have. I know nothing of theory, scales, modes…..nothing. I record or ‘obtain’ drums then I plug in and what comes out is what I feel when I hear the beat set down previously. It has worked for me so far! I think if I sat and constructed pieces and worked everything out methodically it would kill my enjoyment. People are too obsessed with theory dude! Look below any Youtube video of a guitarist and/or rock musician. It’s fucking pathetic the arguments they get into. I think if it rocks then it rocks, and I don’t care if he used a Phrygian, Mixolydian, Triceratops, or Condominium. That’s the downside of the Internet as a musician’s tool, it turns musicians into tools. A wise man, and a great blues guitarist once said to me “Just shut up and play your damned guitar! That is your voice and you can sure as hell use it, so do it!” He passed away a few months after giving me one hell of a great piece of advice. Man, I miss him.

I think if it rocks then it rocks, and I don’t care if he used a Phrygian, Mixolydian, Triceratops, or Condominium.

What is your opinion of “tone chasers”and do you consider yourself one?

AI: Like Eric Johnson? I’ve nothing against them to be honest. If that floats their boat then sure, go for it! I can’t settle for just one sound or tone, I have to be tweaking and finding new things. Lots of different and strange sounds that work into whatever I’m doing at the time.

Who are your idols?

AI: I have way too many to list but I’ll drop in a few names if it helps! Mattias ‘IA’ Eklundh, Shawn Lane, Guthrie Govan, Vai, Satriani, Ron Jarzombek, Rory Gallagher, Hendrix, Beck,

Page, Django Rheinhardt, Newton Faulkner, Eva Cassidy, Jason Becker, Jeff Loomis, Tosin Abasi, Eric Johnson, Danny Gatton……..the list goes on! I can’t play like 99% of these people, but they all in some way or another inspire me, and that inspiration pushes me to learn more, and I think that it is important to draw that inspiration from artists you admire.

What do you get out of playing guitar?

AI: Therapy. I have arthritis in my hands, hips and knees. Playing helps me with the hands part of it to some degree but there are days were they are too sore to even pick the instrument up.I still love it, even though I can’t play the way I used to many years ago. I just adapted my playing to suit what I can do now, as opposed to what I could do then. Not that I’m ever happy with everything I do. I hate some of my recordings with a passion, but I can always find little bits that I think really pop out and make them listenable again. I don’t think I’ll ever reach the level of playing I’d love to reach, or even the level I was at before things took a turn, but I can be happy in knowing that I’m still enjoying the challenge.

How do you keep yourself interested and learning?

AI: Listening to new bands mostly. I hear licks in things that I can relate to, or just enjoy the hell out of and it keeps me wanting to learn new ways of approaching my own playing. For instance, at the moment I’m picking up some really neat riffs with some wide spaced intervals and while it is a struggle to get to grips with considering my handicap, I’m still enthusiastic about it and it keeps me wanting more. I also get a kick out of online collaboration. Hearing how others approach their music and making my own style fit into their stuff really makes me happy. To me that’s what playing is all about, learning from others and on your own, adapting, trying new styles or genres and having fun! Yeah, mostly the fun bit.


And now the collab Allan and I did. I programmed the drums and bass and Allan let it rip on the gitfiddle.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

My sister, Mo, is in town. She’s in town because we are David Byrne-ing it up!(Byrne-ing down the house?) Tonight we get to see him talk about his book How Music Works with Carrie Brownstein, but last night we saw him perform with St. Vincent(Annie Clark) in support of their collaborative album Love This Giant

Intention. Beauty. Art. That is what we witnessed. I’ll be honest. I don’t really know how to write this review; how to properly convey the experience I had. Let me start with the basics and go from there.

There was a minimalist stage set up; just a few stage lights and a plain white backdrop. This was used to great affect when setting the mood. Byrne and St. Vincent both convey an amazing stage presence and are amazing vocalists and, as Mrs. Muffin said, St. Vincent has Prince-like chops on the guitar. The eight-piece horn section, drummer, and keyboardist were tight-every single one of them consummate musicians. Each song had it’s own choreography whether it was dancing, marching around the stage or even having the horn section and Byrne lie down so the attention was aimed at St. Vincent.

Everything was so focussed and thoughtful and every song was so good and every performer so on their game. And here is the part that is kind of hard to explain. I have been to many concerts and had an amazing time. There are times when the artist or band and the audience are so in sync that it becomes transcendent (Belly at LaLuna in ’95 comes to mind). While last night’s concert did not attain that kind of transcendence, it did offer something else-at least to me. About three songs in it all hit me: David Byrne, St. Vincent, the horn section, the drummer, the keyboardist, the amount of work, dedication, passion, talent, and the level of the craft that I was witnessing and then it happened. Bear with me here kids….my eyes watered…they teared up. I didn’t cry, but I would say I was moved to tears. I have heard people talk about being brought to tears by artwork or a piece of music and have never gotten it. I understand those things bringing out something that is already inside of a person, but never believed the art or music did it in and of itself. Maybe I had something inside me that recognized what was going on up on the stage last night, but it seemed bigger than that and it definitely didn’t feel like it was about me.


Of note:
They played three encores and when they introduced the members of the horn section they pointed out that each person had their own table in the lobby selling merchandise for their individual bands they are in outside of the Love This Giant project. That’s class, folks.

Every song was amazing. That is rare, but it’s true.

Read Full Post »

Punker. Rocker. Seriously messed up individual (in the best way possible). Bloody F Mess has made a name for himself playing with GG Allin and founding seminal acts such as Bloody Mess and the Skabs. His current project is The Bloody Mess Rock Circus. This week Some Kind Of Muffin is honored to be joined by the man himself Bloody F Mess and his bass player/writing partner Christopher T. Baggins.


Bloody, I know about your rock n roll and punk pedigree, but I was wondering how you all got together for this current band?

Bloody Mess: THE Bloody Mess Rock Circus was formed by myself, & Christopher & Andy. (& Justin, our ex drummer)
But of course, we have the most awesome Chris Stench on drums and we are pleased. This line up is so perfect for so many reasons!!

Christopher T Baggins: Rock n Roll brought us together…..a mission you might say

How has the band been received?

Bloody Mess: We get great responses from most of our gigs that’s for sure. we’ve played all over the country & have earned new fans and putting smiles on the faces of the older fans, by throwing down, rocking out, and delivering the goods at EVERY show, big or small. The “FRICTION ADDICTION” 2012 USA tour was a bloody blast!

CTB: I love the response we get…love us or hate us , you won’t forget us…

What is your song writing process like?

Bloody Mess: We write both separately and together. But mostly together. I write all the lyrics. The guys write music,songs…Christopher is the main song writer, musically, at this point, but everything shifts on occasion & everyone contributes for sure.

CTB: We all write riffs and jam on them at band practice….I feel lucky to be able to jam with these guys..they make it easy

You recently finished a short tour. What was your favorite show? Other than the one my band, Zombies Love Gizzards, opened for you. smile

Bloody Mess: Favorite gigs of that tour? Hmmmm…Peoria, Illinois I guess. Ironic (its my home town). Portland was a LOT of fun too though & a great kick off to that 11 state tour.We play Portland next on Saturday October 20th at the Twilight Cafe & Bar. Bring some Gizzards & friends out to get down with the Rock Circus!!

CTB: I loved the show in Peoria, San Antonio …truthfully had a blast on the whole tour …met some great people and had great times…memories that can never be taken away from us…

Bloody and Christopher at The Red Room

I know you are looking at recording a CD soon. Can you tell me how that came about, where you are going to record, and when we can expect to see it? 

Bloody Mess: It’ll be my 30th anniversary cd! THE BLOODY MESS ROCK CIRCUS. At least 13 songs Im guessing. Rikk Agnew is producing it for us in L.A. at Robot Kitten studio. Paul Roessler is recording us. I’m super excited about this cd. Not only because of the band (they fucking rock!!!!!!!!!!), but because we have some solid songs ready to unleash! “JUNK MALE”, “OCD IS KILLING ME” & “BLUEST OF THE BLUE” to name a few. Also Sammy Town from FANG is co-writing one song with me & doing vocals on it as well for the album! We hope to record in Winter or Spring. we are doing it right but progressing rapidly. we have about 9 or 10 originals now ready to record. 4 or 5 more and we just tighten up until we feel ready to record! We ARE looking for a label too currently!

CTB: Bloody summed that one up pretty good…recording in LA with Rik Agnew producing and a few guest rockers….really lookin forward to this album

What are your plans for the future?

Bloody Mess: Future? Tour….Hit Europe…Canada….Do more film roles…do more film soundtracks…tour…tour…tour

CTB: Future….more ROCK 

Bloody, I know you are busy with lots of projects outside of the Rock Circus. Can you tell me about those?

Bloody Mess: I’m the host/producer of the Church Of Rock radio show on Sunday nights in southern Oregon and on the net at www.kzze.com (Christopher is the co-host/producer)….Im also one of the southern Oregon Burlesque M.C.’s. I do small acting roles in Independent films. Two are currently in production. BAR-B-GURLZ here in southern Oregon and SPIDARLINGS in London, England. I also go to Haiti in the Fall for a role in VOODOO EXOTICA. Plus, the band & I are writing songs for the soundtracks to these films. I’m also a legal minister & do rock n roll weddings.

What other projects do you have going on Christopher?

CTB: I am Co-Host/Producer of The Church of Rock ….doin a few MC jobs with the Southern Oregon Burlesque Girls…Have a Boutique we just opened in Downtown Medford..“Our Stuff Boutique”…..and I try to sleep on the in between spare minutes…

If you could be one piece of furniture, what would it be and why?

Bloody Mess: I’d be a love seat because Im so fucking lovable!!!!

CTB: I don’t know if you would consider it furniture, but I think I would wanna be a woman’s bicycle seat…


You can catch The Bloody Mess Rock Circus Oct 20th at the Twilight Cafe and Bar 1420 SE Powell Blvd, Portland, Oregon and I HIGHLY recommend it.

Also keep up with Bloody Mess at these sites:

http://www.bloodyfmess.com/fr_thebloodymessrockcircus.cfm

https://www.facebook.com/TheBloodyMessRockCircus?fref=ts

And big thanks to Sarah Jessica Eve and In All Your Glory Photography for use of photos!

Read Full Post »

Last night I got to see Ion Storm‘s inaugural show! They were amazing from the first song to the last. For those unaware I interviewed  them here. Go get acquainted with them and then come right back. It’s OK. I’ll wait.

Everything I’ve heard from them so far has impressed me, but those were only recordings. One really must see them live to get the full impact. First, amazing guitar tone and a pretty tight outfit. I know these guys practice up to 12 hours at a go and it shows. Their current bass player is a recent addition and it showed a bit, but overall he brought the low end. Drummer Tim was solid, fast, and interesting. I thought there was a moment when he was losing the beat, but it was just a part of a tempo change that was written into the song. Grady and Chris had some great harmonized riffage going on that seemed to focus around 4ths and it sounded great. My main complaint was the vocal levels. This show was at the Red Room and their vocals always seem low, but Grady represented growl well.

Oh, did I mention they have a Minotaur? His name is Drew. Look at him.

Do you have a Minotaur? No, you do not. I played bullfighter with Drew for a bit. It was good times.

This band has a lot to offer and brought the heat, which leads me to the title of this post. Look up there ↑ and read it again. At most there were three people up off their butts rocking out, including me and Drew. I wish that this was the exception rather than the rule. I know people want to blame smart phones etc, but it’s not that. In my estimation it’s our self reflective, self conscious society. To put it another way: we are afraid of having fun and looking like fools(Well, not me clearly. I played bullfighter with a Minotaur). It needs to stop now. Do it for yourself. Get up!! Dance! Bang your head!! Visibly enjoy yourself!!!

But also do it for that band up there on the stage or the one on the floor where the pool tables had to be moved to make room. They don’t spend 12 hours at a go writing and rehearsing so you can sit there drinking your PBR and golf clapping after every song. And I can guarantee you they didn’t do it for the money, because bands rarely get paid much if anything just starting out. This is a two way street. They are there for you and you need to be there for them.

Some pics from the show:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Read Full Post »

I don’t know art, or Wilco, but I know what I like and I like this.

http://vimeo.com/49635225

Read Full Post »

 Lia, Ramona, Paul, Tyler. Mittens! Yes, Mittens. What do you need to know about them aside from what is in the interview? That they are awesome and if you don’t like them and fall instantly in love you are dead inside and I hate you.


How did Mittens form and how long have you been together?

Lia: Ramona and I had been playing together for a long time, trying to get our songs together and find members that were a good fit. After a while of searching Ramona decided to look on Craig’s List where she found Paul. We spent a little time as a trio learning each other’s songs till we felt comfortable enough to begin auditioning drummers. Ramona went back on Craig’s List where she found Tyler. And finally Mittens was born. We’ve officially been together since around February or March of 2012.

What’s the meaning behind your name?

Lia: 42 1

How has the band been received?

Ramona: In the short time that we have been playing live, we have had a really positive response! We assumed our fans, at least in the short-term, would mainly consist of our friends and our mascot (Paul’s cat), Butters. So, we were pretty stoked to have other bands and venues contact us to book more shows so shortly after we began playing live. We’ve also received some positive emails from a few fans around the states. We’re happy if our music makes people smile. 🙂

What is your song writing process like?

Paul: What’s our songwriting process anyway? One person comes up with song, tells people, hey, here’s a new song, or hey, Ramona, finish my song?

Ramona: What’s really neat is we have three song writers in the band. Paul, Lia, and I each have a unique flavor in our song writing, which helps keep our music on its toes. Basically, one of us will introduce a song and together the four of us will Mittenize it.

What has been your favorite live show so far?

Lia: I think our favorite show was at the Tin Can Ale House with the Red Starts. The Tin Can is always a fun venue and the crowd was really great that night.

One of the things that stands out for me is your gear. I noticed you use Daisy Rock and the Hello Kitty guitar. Was that an aesthetic choice or a budgetary one?

Paul: Daisy Rock builds guitars for people with smaller builds and hands, and Ramona and myself certainly fall in that category, and the sparkles don’t hurt. Most of our instruments, such as the Mustang Bass and the Hello Kitty, are undersized. While our Hello Kitty guitars are at least part stage prop, they are personalized and modified and have made it to our recordings. My first guitar was a Hello Kitty Strat; I love those things.

What are your plans for the future?

Lia: We’d like to keep playing around, getting a bigger audience is always going to be a goal. I think our main plan is just to keep writing songs and becoming better musicians. Practice Practice.

I know you have recorded some songs. Can you tell me a little about that process and if you plan to release a CD?

Paul: We’ve mostly done recordings in my garage, getting as much as possible recorded in one take, so as to minimize overdubs and time requirements. It’s been a good way to get the first few songs recorded, but we will probably spend a bit more time and do more multi-tracking on our demos from now on.

As for releasing anything, I think it’s best for us to wait on it for now. Although I think we sound pretty good together right now, I’m still somewhat new at guitar and vocals and feel that I still have much progress to make, and I think some of my fellow Mittens also feel a little green at their craft as well. So while we want to continue to do recordings, I think we’re content for them to be demos for now. As we get more live appearances and rehearsal time under our belts, we will start feeling more and more confident about making a release that’s truly compelling.

Why should people come to see you live?

Paul: Well, we smile and harmonize. Most bands don’t bother.

If you could become any non-human animal, what would it be?

Lia: Unicorn

Tyler: Velociraptor/Platypus!

Ramona: Duh, Butters. haha

Paul: Meow


Find Mittens on Facebook

Read Full Post »

This week we are joined by Eddie Regan. He has created a rich and dangerous, yet beautiful world as Effword. I was lucky enough to see Eddie perform with Taint Misbehavin (I hope to have an interview with them in the future). This guy as a lot of energy and it is intense. Some artists talk about being forced to create and Eddie/Effword is one of those artists. Let’s jump into the bizarre, magical, and often unsettling world of Effword.


Give me a little background on yourself. How did you get into music and video production and what projects do you have going right now?

ER: I was born on October 28th, 1983 – three days before Halloween, something I’ve always been influenced by. Growing up I was obsessed with music, horror films, and ghost stories.

During college I studied classical music and also got heavy into electronic music such as Kraftwerk and Walter Carlos. I finished school in 2006, did some traveling and continued to perform as a theater musician. In 2008 I decided to become an electronic solo artist after listening to the album ‘Silent Shout’ by The Knife.

Tell me more about Effword. How did that start and what is your goal with it?

ER: I named myself Effword after a nickname a college friend had given me. The costumes and makeup I wear as Effword add more to the show and the creative process. A lot of my favorite artists perform in makeup, masks, or fucked-up costumes. I’ve always appreciated musical performances that were more than just a band in their everyday clothes playing their songs.

Currently, I have almost enough music video content to release an audiovisual album. Like my live performance, I think it’s very powerful to have a video element for the whole entire thing, start to finish. So, my plan has been to release the album only on DVD and VHS formats.

Another short-term goal is to produce and direct my first short horror film, under my everyday name. The script is almost done, then I’ll move on to casting and coming up with the money… planning to shoot it in springtime!

How do the concepts come about? What is your writing/creative process?

ER: Some ideas just unfold naturally for me, like a dream does when sleeping – it just happens. I also find a lot of energy/motivation from getting inspired by the work of other artists; musicians, filmmakers, and visual artists.

For both writing music and creating film, I usually start out with something very simple – and more ideas come around in the process.

When my friends and I made the most recent music video for an Effword song ‘Zenith Magic’ – the process was a blast. The concept was based around a guy who takes a walk in the graveyard and follows a ghost who leads him to a briefcase which contains his funeral clothes. He puts them on and begins dancing on the ground which will soon become his cold grave. Once we had the idea for that, all kinds of crazy shit started happening! We incorporated little kids, a voodoo doll, a dead mouse, a girl playing Ouija board, a book called ‘Diseases of the Horse’, and a creepy talking genie toy named ‘Zultan’. We filmed almost the entire thing on Super 8 mm in one day, and everyone was really happy with how it turned out. It looks vintage and grainy… the colors turned out very rich.

Why did you choose to synthesize the vocals?

ER: I had been listening to lots of music with vocoder when I started doing that. Once I discovered I could sing polyphonically with a monster voice… I was hooked.

What do you want people to take away from Effword?

ER: More than anything, I want people to be inspired by my work. I want them to feel like they are on a journey, in a trance, when they watch my videos. I want my art to be an escape from reality, and I want people to explore their dark side with me. And for everyone to smash the shit out of their flat screens and get a tube TV.

Are you playing a character when you do Effword or is it just another part of Eddie Regan?

ER: I’ve always thought of Effword as a subconscious entity who wants me to do absolutely nothing but create. He doesn’t give a fuck about a single aspect of my personal life, he doesn’t want me to have one. Sounds crazy, but it’s true!

What has been the overall reaction to Effword?

ER: It’s usually been positive! Especially since I started performing live to my music videos on a projection screen, people really respond to that. Not everyone knows what there getting into when they walk into a show… it’s awesome having the visuals, I’m never going back. People who would normally be out of the room to smoke a fag every three minutes get glued to the screen! I’ve been very lucky to find venues that suit my style as well. The Lovecraft Bar has always been my favorite venue to play, and I’m looking forward to my first show at The Jack London, also the perfect kind of joint for me. At the end of September I’ll go to Astoria to play at The Voodoo Room. It’s decorated with New Orleans Voodoo posters, devils, and other varieties of wierd cool shit! They have a giant Ouija board as one of their seating tables.

The videos all seem to be taking place in the same world. What can you tell me about that world?

ER: I like to explore the gates that lie between the individual’s dream world, the reality-world that we all live in together, and the unknown. I like the experience of exploring those worlds to be timeless. The video for ‘Rotto Cuppo’ was my first expression of that journey. ‘Warm Like Summer’ and ‘Zenith Magic’, while different in many ways, share a similar vibe.

What are you plans for the future with Effword?

ER: On the shorter term, I’ll be playing that show at The Jack London Bar on September 1st, also at the Voodoo Room on September 29th. Probably an October show somewhere back here in Portland. This fall I will shoot a music video soon for my newest song, ‘Murder’. Once I get that done, I should be ready to launch that DVD as a music video album.

As far as longer term goes, concerning Effword – I will probably continue to do more of the same, bring the act to new places, expand my audience. I really want to be an independent film maker, especially in the horror genre. Some people say everything that can be done with horror has been done already. I don’t agree nor do I really give a shit even if it’s true. I’ve always been a Halloween baby and a lifelong fan of horror films… so I want to live and work and play in that world. I want to create a horror sanctuary for both grown-ups and children.

I think a lot of horror filmmakers nowadays try to go for shock value, to push the boundaries further than ever, I would never discourage them! As much as I like that stuff, and I want to do it, I’m more interested in the feel we get from horror, in the world we can create with it. It really is a fantastic and warm place!

If you could be a squash, what kind of squash would it be and why? 

ER: A pumpkin of course!  Since they get faces carved into them they are by far the most expressive squash 😉


Big thanks to Eddie for his time and sharing. You can see more of his videos at Effword on Youtube

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »