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TDCContest

The Deafening Colors’ Make a Music Video Contest

The Deafening Colors want you to make their next music video!

And they are offering a total of $500 in prizes for you to do so.

How does it work? It’s simple. You choose from either, “Parkway South” or “Mary-Anne” (tracks one and two on our 2015 album, “Carousel Season”) and you make a video for the song.

Submit the song by emailing the file (or private link to Dropbox) to thedeafeningcolors@gmail.com by 11:59 PM on Sunday, May 22, 2016 and we will pick our favorites. By submitting, you are stating that you agree to the Terms & Conditions below.

First prize will receive $400 and your video will be released as our official video for the song, posted to our YouTube page and our website and shared with the world.

Second prize will receive $100 and your video will also be released as our official video (the second place winner will be selected from the entries for whichever song did not win the first place prize) and shared with the world. Winners will be announced and videos released on Monday, May 30, 2016.

There is no entry fee, but we ask that you purchase whichever song you are making the video for at the price of .99 cents, available from thedeafeningcolors.bandcamp.com, from iTunes, or from many other online retailers.

For more information please contact thedeafeningcolors@gmail.com.

About The Deafening Colors:

The Deafening Colors are an indie band from New Jersey. They have performed live on WFMU, at The Bowery Electric, The Knitting Factory, Maxwell’s and many other venues and radio stations. Their newest album, “Carousel Season,” was described by WFMU as “an album that brims over with beautiful and poignant pop music.” They have been featured in the Press of Atlantic City, You Don’t Know Jersey, and Popdose, among many other publications.

Terms & Conditions

By submitting you are giving The Deafening Colors the right to publish your video submission on our website, our YouTube channel, or anywhere else that we deem appropriate.
You may also choose to share your video, whether your entry wins or not, on your own website, YouTube channel, or in any other manner available, as long as you credit The Deafening Colors and link to or share either www.thedeafeningcolors.com or www.thedeafeningcolors.bandcamp.com in both the description of the video and in the credits.
Winning submissions become the property of The Deafening Colors. Filmmaker(s) will be credited wherever distributed.
The Deafening Colors retain the right to forego choosing a winner depending on the quality of submissions.
The Deafening Colors reserve the right to change or alter the Terms and Conditions without notice at any time.
By submitting you are agreeing to all of the above Terms & Conditions.

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Today I am proud to bring you a review of the Killswitch Engage concert I attended at the Hawthorne Theater. I am really excited because this is our first guest review! Dylan DePriest kindly asked me along to the show and even more kindly agreed to write up the review! Oh, and when he talks about “the Reverend” that’s me and here’s why (<–follow link).


Killswitch Engage

Killswitch Engage concert review
28 November 2012
Portland, OR
It was a typical cold Wednesday night in Portland. For many it was the milestone marking the middle of the work week, but for metalheads it was the night that Acaro, Shadows Fall, and Killswitch Engage were performing in our great city. This show’s placement in the middle of the work week refined the crowd from people finding something to do on their day off to people who would risk their sleep schedules to see three amazing bands.
I’ve always found that waiting in line outside of the venue is a great start to a show because you get to hear what people say about the bands. The Reverend and I stood right next to someone who was less than affectionate for Shadows Fall; we noted this because her choice to use derogatory terms in her description of the band rather than her choosing to use a more logical and fact-based argument that other people would use. (editor’s note: she called Brian Fair, Shadows Fall’s lead singer “gay” and she didn’t mean he was homosexual, so clearly she is font of taste and discernment, or you know someone who needs to be made aware that is not cool) This conversation continued until we had finally passed Hawthorne Theatre’s security.
Acaro were the opening act for the night and they sounded great and performed great as well. Unfortunately the crowd was pretty weak at this point in the show because that the place wasn’t full and people weren’t warmed up yet. Two guys along with the Reverend and I were the only ones moshing which was fun, but it wasn’t super intense in terms of overall crowd intensity. Acaro’s set was great in terms of performance, but they only played about half an hour.
By the time Shadows Fall came on, the crowd had filled in significantly which brought along the 300 lb. moshers, which pretty much ruled my participation out. Shadows Fall were amazing performers, excelling significantly in their manipulation of the stage lighting and their ability to excite the crowd. Also, Brian Fair’s dreads were a great addition in terms of the visual aspect of the set. The crowd was great as well, people had started to stagedive and be more involved in the metal experience. (editor’s note: DD did plenty of stagediving his own self)
After two great acts, Killswitch Engage performed and did a damn good job of it too. Killswitch Engage started with some Howard Jones-era songs, which was really quite great to experience since Jesse Leach is the band’s vocalist again. The band then performed their entire “Alive or Just Breathing” record. I’ve listened to that record many times from start to finish and it never gets old, so having the live experience was absolutely amazing and, based upon the way the crowd acted, they felt largely the same too. After performing the entire record, Killswitch ended with two more Howard Jones-era songs, ultimately bringing their set to around two hours in length.
This concert was one of the greatest shows I have ever been to. After the opening, the crowd was intense, responsive, and fully engaged in the metal experience. While the show was at a small venue, which is a complaint from many people but not from me, the show was amazing and the music was loud. All three of these bands were great performers and even though I wasn’t completely familiar with all of the songs by the first two bands, they made an environment that was great for new fans and diehards alike. This will be a show that I will remember for many years to come.


I can’t thank Dylan enough for inviting me along and for writing this review.

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Today we return to Los Angeles to speak with Steven Eric Wilson of Plasticsoul. We’re going deep, kids. Hang on tight.


Tell me a little about your background. How you got into music. 

Steven Eric Wilson: I had 5 older brothers and sisters who filled my head with all sorts of music from as early as I can remember.  It was probably Kiss who made me want to be a musician.  They were like super heroes with guitars.

How did Plasticsoul come together?

SEW: When I was 15 I joined my first band – a really horrible punk band – playing bass guitar.  Our guitar player had a $15 pawn shop guitar that was made from particle board.  Our drummer played Synsonics drums (no, seriously).  I played with a couple more bands after that before I got disillusioned with the whole “band” thing and decided to do things on my own.   I liked the idea of being a solo artist while using a band moniker like Matt Johnson/The The.  Originally I wanted to call the band The Sal Mineos but my friend told me that I might have problems with the estate of Sal Mineo so I changed it to Plasticsoul. During the recording of our first album, Pictures From The Long Ago, Marc Bernal became a permanent fixture in the group.  We did as much of the production, recording, and playing as we could do on our own, and got help from our friends when we couldn’t.  During the recording of our second album, Peacock Swagger, we made the decision to add members to the group in order to better recreate live what we were doing in the studio.

Is your band’s name “Plasticsoul” a reference to the term black musicians in the 60s used to describe Mick Jagger (a white musician singing soul music)?

SEW: Yes.  After that Paul McCartney said “plastic soul man, plastic soul” in the fade out of The Beatles track “I’m Down”.  Then they mutated the phrase into their album title Rubber Soul.  I wanted something that reminded people of vintage music.  All of our amps and guitars are pre 1970 and we are heavily influenced by classic rock, so it seemed appropriate.

 I hear some Beatles influence, but mostly in the vocals. Is that intentional?

SEW: The Beatles are a huge influence on me.  They were innovators and they wrote amazing songs.  I don’t intentionally try to sing like any member of The Beatles and I don’t really hear it myself.  It’s strange how many people hear different things in my voice.  I’ve gotten Michael Penn, George Michael (??) and Billy Corgan (?!?!?!) and others.

Tell me about the song “Over & Over.”

SEW: Over & Over is about trying to ignore emotional pain by burying it deep within you and trying to forget it.  I grew up trying to do this and it doesn’t work.  Eventually all of that poison will bubble back up to the surface and really mess you up mentally and physically.  That song was a big exorcism for me.  I’m really proud of that one.

What inspires you musically and lyrically?

SEW: I’m inspired by whatever I’m feeling at the time.  I’m not usually very direct in my lyric writing.  My lyrics tend to be more about imagery than about saying something specific.  I like leaving things open to interpretation.

I’m inspired musically by real instruments.  Music that is made without digital correction.  I love hearing mistakes.  Some of my favorite parts of songs are mistakes or things that shouldn’t be there.  The squeaky kick drum pedal in James Brown’s Sex Machine makes me smile every time.

Yes! Exactly. Jimi Hendrix is someone who has inspired so many guitarists to be extremely proficient and yet he has mistakes on his albums and also never played his songs the same way twice. Is Plasticsoul similarly fluid live?

SEW: Oh god yes!  Our bass player Marc often complains because we sound so different live than we do on record.  To me, that’s a good thing.  There was a band in the 80’s that I really loved called Lions & Ghosts.  On their first album they had all of these lush string arrangements, piano, etc, and when you saw them live it was just 2 guitars, bass, drums, and vocals.  And they were AWESOME live!  That was what I wanted with Plasticsoul.  Our guitar player Daniel is always changing up his pedals so his sound is often different, and he rarely plays the exact same thing twice.   My guitar solos tend to be more scripted but that is just because I’m not as good a guitar player as Daniel.  Overall, I think we still sound like Plasticsoul when we perform live.

What do you want people to get from your music?

SEW: The beauty of imperfection.

What do you get from your music?

SEW:  Catharsis

What are your highest aspirations for Plasticsoul?

SEW: I would be very happy if I could make enough money from my music to support myself, my wife, and our cats.  That doesn’t mean I would be upset if suddenly we were as big as Queen and playing stadiums.  If we can continue to make music that I can be proud of, make a living, and take the show on the road so we can meet the people outside the US that bought our records, I would be very happy

What is your assessment of the LA music scene and music in general right now?

SEW: There are some amazing musicians in Los Angeles making fabulous records.  Brandon Schott (who is a casual member of Plasticsoul), the breakups, John Hoskinson, Everyday Ghost, The Condors, Brian Whelan…tons of great artists!  Unfortunately, the club scene isn’t very supportive.  If we could inject the passion of our LA musicians into our LA club owners we might be able to achieve something.

Chicken, pork, beef, or tofu?

SEW: Back in August I cut all animal protein out of my diet with the exception of chicken and fish.  One of the things I thought I was going to miss the most was chorizo.  Then I found SOYrizo and its delicious – so I will have to go with tofu.


 

Plasticsoul’s latest CD Peacock Swagger voted

#1 on Absolute Powerpop’s Top 100 CDs of 2009 List!

#1 on PowerPopAholic’s Top CD’s of 2009 List!

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Today we are joined by Todd Stone. He comes from a very musical family and wears his influences on his sleeve. Fans of The Cure and Joy Division will definitely want to check him out, but I recommend everyone give him a listen regardless of your musical preferences!


 

You come from a very musical family. What can you tell me about what that was like and what impact it had on you?

Todd Stone: Yes, my family from my Mother’s side were very musical. My Grandparents used to play to the US Army troops, based here in the 2nd World War. My Grandad on piano and my Nan singing. My Uncle who I haven’t seen since I was a young teen, used to play keyboards in Georgie Fame’s band, The Blue Jets. But he chose to go into business after a short spell of that. Growing up it was kind of normal listening to my Nan playing the piano & my Mum was always singing about the house and the radio was on every waking hour.

You played in “The Wicked Messengers” & “The Love Rats”. What were those experiences like? What did you learn from being in those bands?

TS: “The Wicked Messengers” and “The Love Rats” were my first experiences of playing live. I kind of always wrote everything and then put it to the band and they would fill their parts in. The band members never really came to me with anything they had written. Live I think we were really good, we took our fooling around with us to the stage; at times it got to be more of a comedy show, but it was a great time of drink and other stuff going on. but the downside of being in those bands was nothing really got organized. We really needed a manager to reign us in and keep us under control.

Why did you decide to pursue a solo career?

TS: I went solo, because I felt I could be more serious about the music and not have to rely on other band members turning up or not turning up. Also, I had a lot of songs inside me I didn’t feel were suitable for the bands I’d played with before. I locked myself away and recorded morning, noon, and night. I feel I’ve been at my most creative on my own. But maybe in the future I will get another band together, but there will be restrictions on the drunken behaviour that seems to go on with being in a band.

Why did you choose to do all of the instrumentation yourself as a solo artist?

TS: I played all the instruments myself for 2 reasons. I wanted to grow in my musical knowledge and really push myself to see what would come out. It was a great excuse to explore instruments I had very little experience of. The other reason is I knew what kind of direction I wanted to take the music in and when you have other people involved it tends to get pulled into other directions. I’m very selfish when it comes to my songs.

“Emotion for me in a song is everything.”

Tell me about the importance and impact of emotion on your songwriting.

TS: Emotion for me in a song is everything. I write what comes from the heart and I’m gravitated to music that has an overwhelming sense of emotion, and emotion covers a lot of ground, from happiness, sadness, anger etc.

What do you hope people get from your music?

TS: I hope when people listen to my songs, that they can relate to the lyrics or get where I’m coming from. I have a lot of depressing songs in my catalogue, but amongst them there are rockier ones and happy pop type songs.

Your song writing seems very much rooted in a certain time and place. For me, as a US citizen, I get a late 70s early 80s London vibe. What is it about that music and that time and place that speaks to you?

TS: I guess the early eighties for me was a very inspiring time, especially as I was in my early teens. I was discovering myself. Bands like “The Cure,” “Bauhaus,”  “Joy Division” spoke to me the most. I could relate a lot of what was going on in my life to the lyrics of their songs and the general mood of their tracks. But I feel music had tons more emotion in it back then than it does now. Even the silly pop songs had more originality to it. I think Cyndi Lauper was massively creative in her image as well as her music.

What is your view/opinion of the current music scene in London?

TS: The current music scene, I don’t think has changed a great deal. There’s some great bands out there, but due to how easy it is to record these days and get exposed, I feel the market has flooded itself. But as always the record companies seem to only be interested in kids with very little talent other than to sing. I believe it’s because they’re easier to control and package exactly the way they want it. Which is a great shame for the real bands out there with masses of talent, that have their own very strong image and style of music. London still has a lot of great venues to play, but sadly over the past decade they do seem to be in decline. If live music became more popular again, maybe the record company’s would look more at the live bands that are out there doing it.

What inspires you?

TS: What inspires me, the main things that inspire me, is seeing someone make something of themselves from nothing and seeing people who have some form of disability, just not letting it effect their lives and then go on to achieve amazing things. It has often brought a tear to my eye. I’m silly like that.

What are your plans for the future?

TS: My future plans have already been planned out, well at least the next 2 albums. I plan on doing a very acoustic set of songs & do them live.

If you could be one kind of donut what would it be and why?

TS: Haha I think at times I am a donut, just a plain ol’ donut lol


Follow Todd at Reverb Nation: http://reverbnation.com/toddstone

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So, last night one of the bands I am in, Zombies Love Gizzards, was on Anarchy Radio! We had a blast. You can click the following link and listen. We com in around the 1:28:00 mark. Got to talk about ourselves and they play 4 of our songs!

http://www.houseofsound.org/programs/112-anarchy-radio

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Punker. Rocker. Seriously messed up individual (in the best way possible). Bloody F Mess has made a name for himself playing with GG Allin and founding seminal acts such as Bloody Mess and the Skabs. His current project is The Bloody Mess Rock Circus. This week Some Kind Of Muffin is honored to be joined by the man himself Bloody F Mess and his bass player/writing partner Christopher T. Baggins.


Bloody, I know about your rock n roll and punk pedigree, but I was wondering how you all got together for this current band?

Bloody Mess: THE Bloody Mess Rock Circus was formed by myself, & Christopher & Andy. (& Justin, our ex drummer)
But of course, we have the most awesome Chris Stench on drums and we are pleased. This line up is so perfect for so many reasons!!

Christopher T Baggins: Rock n Roll brought us together…..a mission you might say

How has the band been received?

Bloody Mess: We get great responses from most of our gigs that’s for sure. we’ve played all over the country & have earned new fans and putting smiles on the faces of the older fans, by throwing down, rocking out, and delivering the goods at EVERY show, big or small. The “FRICTION ADDICTION” 2012 USA tour was a bloody blast!

CTB: I love the response we get…love us or hate us , you won’t forget us…

What is your song writing process like?

Bloody Mess: We write both separately and together. But mostly together. I write all the lyrics. The guys write music,songs…Christopher is the main song writer, musically, at this point, but everything shifts on occasion & everyone contributes for sure.

CTB: We all write riffs and jam on them at band practice….I feel lucky to be able to jam with these guys..they make it easy

You recently finished a short tour. What was your favorite show? Other than the one my band, Zombies Love Gizzards, opened for you. smile

Bloody Mess: Favorite gigs of that tour? Hmmmm…Peoria, Illinois I guess. Ironic (its my home town). Portland was a LOT of fun too though & a great kick off to that 11 state tour.We play Portland next on Saturday October 20th at the Twilight Cafe & Bar. Bring some Gizzards & friends out to get down with the Rock Circus!!

CTB: I loved the show in Peoria, San Antonio …truthfully had a blast on the whole tour …met some great people and had great times…memories that can never be taken away from us…

Bloody and Christopher at The Red Room

I know you are looking at recording a CD soon. Can you tell me how that came about, where you are going to record, and when we can expect to see it? 

Bloody Mess: It’ll be my 30th anniversary cd! THE BLOODY MESS ROCK CIRCUS. At least 13 songs Im guessing. Rikk Agnew is producing it for us in L.A. at Robot Kitten studio. Paul Roessler is recording us. I’m super excited about this cd. Not only because of the band (they fucking rock!!!!!!!!!!), but because we have some solid songs ready to unleash! “JUNK MALE”, “OCD IS KILLING ME” & “BLUEST OF THE BLUE” to name a few. Also Sammy Town from FANG is co-writing one song with me & doing vocals on it as well for the album! We hope to record in Winter or Spring. we are doing it right but progressing rapidly. we have about 9 or 10 originals now ready to record. 4 or 5 more and we just tighten up until we feel ready to record! We ARE looking for a label too currently!

CTB: Bloody summed that one up pretty good…recording in LA with Rik Agnew producing and a few guest rockers….really lookin forward to this album

What are your plans for the future?

Bloody Mess: Future? Tour….Hit Europe…Canada….Do more film roles…do more film soundtracks…tour…tour…tour

CTB: Future….more ROCK 

Bloody, I know you are busy with lots of projects outside of the Rock Circus. Can you tell me about those?

Bloody Mess: I’m the host/producer of the Church Of Rock radio show on Sunday nights in southern Oregon and on the net at www.kzze.com (Christopher is the co-host/producer)….Im also one of the southern Oregon Burlesque M.C.’s. I do small acting roles in Independent films. Two are currently in production. BAR-B-GURLZ here in southern Oregon and SPIDARLINGS in London, England. I also go to Haiti in the Fall for a role in VOODOO EXOTICA. Plus, the band & I are writing songs for the soundtracks to these films. I’m also a legal minister & do rock n roll weddings.

What other projects do you have going on Christopher?

CTB: I am Co-Host/Producer of The Church of Rock ….doin a few MC jobs with the Southern Oregon Burlesque Girls…Have a Boutique we just opened in Downtown Medford..“Our Stuff Boutique”…..and I try to sleep on the in between spare minutes…

If you could be one piece of furniture, what would it be and why?

Bloody Mess: I’d be a love seat because Im so fucking lovable!!!!

CTB: I don’t know if you would consider it furniture, but I think I would wanna be a woman’s bicycle seat…


You can catch The Bloody Mess Rock Circus Oct 20th at the Twilight Cafe and Bar 1420 SE Powell Blvd, Portland, Oregon and I HIGHLY recommend it.

Also keep up with Bloody Mess at these sites:

http://www.bloodyfmess.com/fr_thebloodymessrockcircus.cfm

https://www.facebook.com/TheBloodyMessRockCircus?fref=ts

And big thanks to Sarah Jessica Eve and In All Your Glory Photography for use of photos!

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